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The Four-Fold Way: Walking the Paths of the Warrior, Teacher, Healer, and Visionary

The Four-Fold Way: Walking the Paths of the Warrior, Teacher, Healer, and Visionary by Angeles Arrien

Some of my favourite excerpts…

We live in an age that is calling for a “new world order.” Our current world order actually consists of four worlds: (1) the highly industrialized First World countries, such as the United States and the nations of Western Europe; (2) the Second World socialist block nations; (3) the developing countries of the Third World, such as Brazil or Thailand; and (4) the Fourth World, which George Manuel of the World Council of Indigenous Peoples describes in the Gaia Atlas of First Peoples (Burger) as the “name given to indigenous peoples descended from a country’s aboriginal population and who today are completely or partly deprived of the right to their own territory and riches. The peoples of the Fourth World have only limited influence or none at all in the national state to which they belong.” The differences between these worlds can be stated very simply: The First, Second, and Third Worlds believe that “the land belongs to the people”; the Fourth World believes that “the people belong to the land.” A new world order can be created once all four worlds create a bridge that is truly healing.

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No matter what world we live in now, we are all people of the earth, connected to one another by our mutual humanity. When we listen to land-based peoples, we are listening to our oldest selves. Indigenous cultures support change and healing, transition and rites of passage, through mythic structures and through the incorporation into daily life of art, science, music, ritual, and drama. Every culture in the world has singing, dancing, and storytelling, and these are practices to which we all have access. We also have access to the four inner archetypes, or blueprints for human behavior, which are present in the mythic structure of societies the world over.

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My research has demonstrated that virtually all shamanic traditions draw on the power of four archetypes in order to live in harmony and balance with our environment and with our own inner nature: the Warrior, the Healer, the Visionary, and the Teacher. Because each archetype draws on the deepest mythic roots of humanity, we too can tap into their wisdom. When we learn to live these archetypes within ourselves, we will begin to heal ourselves and our fragmented world.

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The following four principles, each based on an archetype, comprise what I call the Four-Fold Way: Show up, or choose to be present. Being present allows us to access the human resources of power, presence, and communication. This is the way of the Warrior. Pay attention to what has heart and meaning. Paying attention opens us to the human resources of love, gratitude, acknowledgment, and validation. This is the way of the Healer. Tell the truth without blame or judgment. Nonjudgmental truthfulness maintains our authenticity, and develops our inner vision and intuition. This is the way of the Visionary. Be open to outcome, not attached to outcome. Openness and nonattachment help us recover the human resources of wisdom and objectivity. This is the way of the Teacher.

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Many indigenous societies believe that we all possess “original medicine”: personal power, duplicated nowhere else on the planet. No two individuals carry the same combination of talents or challenges; therefore, when we compare ourselves to others, native peoples see this as a sign that we do not believe that we have original medicine. This belief affects not only ourselves, but extends into the world. Not to be “in our medicine” or bring our power into the world precludes healing from coming to Mother Nature and all her creatures.

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My research has shown that universally there are three kinds of power: power of presence, power of communication, and power of position. People in shamanic societies believe that a person who has all three powers embodies “big medicine” and cannot be ignored.

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Shamanic cultures have a variety of apprenticeship and training for developing these leadership and empowerment skills. For many indigenous cultures, soul retrieval work is an empowerment skill employed by those who desire to bring lost parts of themselves back home. Sandra Ingerman in her book Soul Retrieval describes this ancient methodology. The empowerment tools used in this work include rattle work, dancing, standing meditation, and power animals and helping allies.

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Native peoples recognize that the most empowering and healing tool that we have available to us is our connection to nature and the wilderness. In his book Indian Country, Peter Matthiessen reminds us of the deep connection between nature and spirit:

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Biologically, in order to maintain our vitality and energy levels, it is imperative to be outdoors for one full hour every day. As children we spent more time outdoors than we did indoors; and as adults we spend more time indoors than outdoors. To maintain our well-being, it is necessary to our vitality and spirit to connect daily with natural light, air, and earth. In their cave art. Neolithic societies represented the biological need for human beings to be connected to nature by the repeated drawings of individuals as trees, or what appear to be “tree people.”

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When we are not fully present or empowered, we find ourselves caught in the shadow of the Warrior archetype. We have not claimed the Warrior or leader within our nature if we see in our lives the themes of rebellion, unclaimed authority or projecting our authority onto others, and patterns of invisibility.

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When we have an authority issue with someone, we have not fully owned the Warrior archetype and we are projecting our authority onto someone else rather than claiming it. People with authority issues are drawn to effective leaders and have a tendency either to over-idealize them or to compete with them. Behind every individual who has an authority issue is the unwillingness to claim personal responsibility, and often an unconscious desire to have someone else be responsible.

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We often avoid reclaiming personal power by participating in patterns of invisibility. These patterns include hiding or holding back or “riding on the coattails” of powerful people. Low self-esteem and the inability to see oneself correctly is often at the root of the pattern of hiding or holding back. Another form of remaining invisible is to influence situations from behind the scenes.

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PROCESSES AND REMINDERS: IMPORTANT PRACTICES TO DEVELOP THE INNER WARRIOR 1. Spend at least fifteen minutes each day in standing meditation. Record your experience in your journal or create a special meditation log.

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2. Spend one hour in nature or out-of-doors every day for maintenance of health and well-being.

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4. Set aside time daily for some kind of exercise, bodywork, or movement. Many indigenous cultures use the power of movement (such as ceremonial dance, Chiltan postures, yoga. Tai Chi, or other martial arts) to awaken the inner Warrior. Today we use aerobics, running, swimming, gymnastics, walking, and other kinds of exercise to help maintain access to our leadership skills.

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5. Spend time each day being aware of how you handle unexpected events or surprises. Something unexpected happens every day, but we need not be knocked off balance. As we learn to accept and work with them, these occurrences can teach us how to stay centered and flexible at the same time—a practice necessary for any effective

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6. Spend time honoring the guidances of your power animal and helping allies.

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SUMMARY OF THE WARRIOR ARCHETYPE The Warrior is the archetype of leadership. We come into our leadership skills by staying in our power, by showing up and choosing to be present, by extending honor and respect, and by being responsible and accountable.

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Where in my life did I stop dancing? Where in my life did I stop singing? Where in my life did I stop being enchanted with stories? Where in my life did I become uncomfortable with the sweet territory of silence? Many indigenous peoples believe that wherever in our lives we stopped dancing, singing, being enchanted with stories, or began experiencing difficulty with silence is where we began to experience soul loss or loss of spirit. Dancing is the Warrior’s way to retrieve those parts of the self that are lost or unremembered. Work with Roth’s five rhythms as a soul retrieval tool for self-empowerment.

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Who are the leaders and people who have carried the “Warrior spirit,” who have inspired me and have been sources of empowerment in history and in contemporary times? The people who inspire you do so because they mirror aspects of your own inner Warrior, reminding you of your own inherent leadership skills. Make a list or a visual collage of these people to reinforce the Warrior’s gifts within that are waiting to be claimed.

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Of the three shadow aspects of the Warrior, what patterns of invisibility have I explored? In what parts of my life have I been a rebel? In what parts of my life have I had authority issues? In what parts of my life have I experienced being a victim? The shadow aspects of the Warrior archetype reveal aspects of leadership skills that are waiting to be claimed. Work with the Warrior empowerment tools described in this chapter to claim or liberate your trapped power.

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Last night, as I was sleeping, I dreamt—marvellous error!— that I had a beehive here inside my heart. And the golden bees were making white combs and sweet honey from my old failures. —Antonio Machado, Times Alone

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Among indigenous cultures the Healer supports the principle of paying attention to what has heart and meaning. Healers in all major traditions recognize that the power of love is the most potent healing force available to all human beings. Effective Healers from any culture are those who extend the arms of love: acknowledgment, acceptance, recognition, validation, and gratitude.

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Many native cultures believe that the heart is the bridge between Father Sky and Mother Earth. For these traditions the four-chambered heart, the source for sustaining emotional and spiritual health, is described as being full, open, clear, and strong. These traditions feel that it is important to check the condition of the four-chambered heart daily, asking: “Am I full-hearted, open-hearted, clear-hearted, and strong-hearted?”

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Where we are not full-hearted, we approach people and situations half-heartedly. The experience of feeling like we should do something when we don’t want to is the breeding ground for half-heartedness. Feeling half-hearted is an announcement of wrong placement, and it is time to remove ourselves from these situations. Where we are not open-hearted, we become closed-hearted. Being defensive, encountering our own resistance, and protecting ourselves from the possibility of hurt are signals of closed-heartedness. The answer is to soften and reopen the heart. Where we are not clear-hearted we are confused and carrying a doubting heart. This is where we need to wait. States of ambivalence and indifference are precursors to confusion and doubt. When we experience any of these states, we are reminded to wait for clarity rather than to take action. Where we are not strong-hearted is where we lack the courage to be authentic or to say what is true for us. Strong-heartedness is where we have the courage to be all of who we are in our life. The word “courage” is derived from the French word for heart, coeur, and etymologically it means “the ability to stand by one’s heart or to stand by one’s core.” Whenever we exhibit courage, we demonstrate the healing power of paying attention to what has heart and meaning for us.

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Maintaining the health of our four-chambered heart allows us to explore and open to the six kinds of universal love: Love between mates and lovers Love between parent and child Love between colleagues and friends Professional love between teacher and student, therapist and client, and so on Love of self Unconditional love or spiritual love

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All these kinds of love are doorways to healing. As we open to them, our ability to retain a balanced view of healing increases. Jeanne Achterberg, in her book Woman as Healer, reminds us of the following concepts, which contribute toward a balanced view of healing: Healing is a lifelong journey toward wholeness. Healing is remembering what has been forgotten about connection, and unity and interdependence among all things living and nonliving. Healing is embracing what is most feared. Healing is opening what has been closed, softening what has hardened into obstruction. Healing is entering into the transcendent, timeless moment when one experiences the divine. Healing is creativity and passion and love. Healing is seeking and expressing self in its fullness, its light and shadow, its male and female. Healing is learning to trust life.

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Healers throughout the world recognize the importance of maintaining or retrieving the four universal healing salves: storytelling, singing, dancing, and silence. Shamanic societies believe that when we stop singing, stop dancing, are no longer enchanted by stories, or become uncomfortable with silence, we experience soul loss, which opens the door to discomfort and disease. The gifted Healer restores the soul through use of the healing salves.

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Indigenous cultures recognize that storytelling can reshape an individual’s experience or life story. Many shamans and medicine people are gifted storytellers. Such people are called “shape-shifters,” because they have the capacity to shift the shape of an individual’s story, or even to shift the shape of their own physical appearance. A shaman who has this ability is considered a healing catalyst and change agent. Contemporary shape-shifters are the gifted medical people, therapists, ministers, counselors, and others who assist people through life transitions.

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Write the wrongs that are done to you in sand, but write the good things that happen to you on a piece of marble. Let go of all emotions such as resentment and retaliation, which diminish you, and hold onto the emotions, such as gratitude and joy, which increase you. —Arabic proverb (Van Ekeren, The Speaker’s Sourcebook)

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Some indigenous peoples use this drumming practice to connect with healing and spiritual guidance. When we embark on such a journey, we open ourselves to the possibility of removing the blocks and obstacles to receiving love and giving love. This is the practice for developing a full, strong, open, and clear heart.

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In his research Andrew Neher reports that the sonic driving of the drum can affect the alignment of brain-resonant frequency with external auditory stimuli, and that this alignment can rebalance the central nervous system.

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The lying posture is the most healing posture that the body can assume. The body equates this posture with rest and the nourishment that comes from receiving and giving love. It is the posture of surrender and openness. The lying posture assumed in the journey is a way of placing the body in its own “spirit canoe” in order to open to guidance and to receive healing. This provides us with an opportunity to observe both positive and challenging experiences that we need to address. The lying posture is used in many different cultures as the major posture in which to receive healing.

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looking at addictions from a cross-cultural perspective, I discovered that this is true and that there are four basic addictive patterns that human beings share: The addiction to intensity. The unclaimed human resource is the expression of love. The addiction to perfection. The unclaimed human resource is the expression of excellence and right use of power. The addiction to the need to know. The unclaimed human resource is the expression of wisdom. The addiction to being fixated on what’s not working rather than what is working. The unclaimed human resource is the expression of vision and ways of looking at the whole.

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Spend some time each day checking the condition of your own four-chambered heart. Are you paying attention to what has heart and meaning for you? Or is your heart entrapped by “shoulds”?

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SUMMARY OF THE HEALER ARCHETYPE The Healer archetype asks that we pay attention to what has heart and meaning. We develop our inner Healer when we attend to the condition and well-being of the four-chambered heart; when we extend acknowledgment and the arms of love to ourselves and others; and when we hold a balanced view of health.

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Think about your responses to the following questions. To develop the inner Healer, ask and answer question 10 daily. What are my favorite childhood stories? What stories from childhood have I passed onto others? What are the stories about myself that I bring forward when I meet new people? What are your favorite spiritual stories, family stories, and love stories? What do I know about love? Who are the people that have been teachers of my heart? Create a picture collage of your favorite teachers of the heart or write letters of gratitude to them. What are the blocks and obstacles that get in the way of my giving love? What are the blocks and obstacles that get in the way of my receiving love? Where and with whom do I feel that my love is received? Who are the healing catalysts in my life? Of the four universal acknowledgments, which have I consistently received? Which do I seldom receive? (See Summary Chart.) Of the four addictions, where do I have the most experience and which is the most developed in me? (See Summary Chart.) Review Jeanne Achterberg’s balanced view of healing. Which of those concepts or views are not fully engaged or held in my own concept of healing? How can I incorporate these views into my daily life? Of the eight universals that sustain health and well-being, which ones are currently over-expressed and which are undeveloped within my nature? Use the rest of the year to bring all eight into balance. What is the condition of my four-chambered-heart: Where am I full-hearted? Where am I clear-hearted? Where am I open-hearted? Where am I strong-hearted?

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AN ODE TO MY FATHER HEALING THE CRITIC When I awake in the morning, It is either the very next day after many, many days, Or it is the very first day. When it is the very next day after many, many days, I know the time has come For me to walk through the door, To take a look at that dark part of me that is calling. And to touch that place of willingness to look again. I know the time has come For me to walk through the door To take a look at this critic within, Who only wants me to listen To what needs to be heard, So I then can heal and bring that part of me back to me. When I awake in the morning, It is either the very next day after many, many days Or it is the very first day. Today, it is the very first day Of what exists now. —Twainhart Hill

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When we follow the way of the Visionary, we are able to make the truth visible. In indigenous societies visionaries may be shamans or artisans; but what is more important, these societies encourage all members to seek and express truth. The principle that guides the Visionary is telling the truth without blame or judgment. When we express the inner Visionary, we know and communicate our creative purpose and life dream, act from our authentic self, are truthful, and honor the four ways of seeing.

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The majority of the spiritual traditions cite two patterns that can take us out of our Sacred Hoop, out of our true nature. Psychiatrist Roger Walsh in his book Staying Alive describes those patterns as the patterns of denial and the patterns of indulgence. Every human being, regardless of cultural conditioning and family imprinting, experiences these patterns at some time.

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We express denial in our lives when we avoid certain people or issues and when we see things only as we want them to be rather than to accept them as they are. Underneath every denial pattern is the underlying fear that we will not be able to handle conflict and a deep human need to maintain peace, balance, and harmony at all costs. In deep denial we will abandon ourselves to keep the peace rather than communicate our feelings directly. We express indulgence when we dramatize or sensationalize our experience. Often we exaggerate a situation or an issue in order to seek attention. Underneath this pattern is a high need for approval and acceptance that is ruled either by the fear of not being seen or the fear of being seen. People who make scenes, throw tantrums, or blow things out of proportion actually have a strong need for acceptance. Because they are terrified of their own feelings of insecurity or vulnerability, they use exaggeration as a way to hide those feelings. It is the Visionary who knows how to dissolve the polarities and paradoxes that are found in patterns of denial and indulgence.

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When we can answer “yes” to the question, “Is my self-worth as strong as my self-critic?” then we are ready to engage our creative expression beyond patterns of denial or indulgence.

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Communication that carries integrity always considers timing and context before the delivery of content. So often we know exactly what we want to say, but we do not consider whether it is the right time or the right place in which to deliver the content of our communication. Direct communication—giving voice to what we see without blame or judgment—means we must consider the alignment of appropriate word choice, tone of voice, and body posture.

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In meditation we listen to and observe the guidance that is given. The distinction between prayer and meditation is best described by a nine-year-old friend who said, “Prayer is when you talk to God, and meditation is when you listen to what God has to say.” In most societies prayer is a way to have a dialogue with the sacred.

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Many shamanic traditions hold the belief that any solitary time that is spent in nature for purposes of reflection and guidance reawakens us to our own life purpose and remembering the original medicine that is ours to offer to all creatures and human beings.

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The Visionary archetype, as we have seen, is the truth-teller. We experience the shadow side of the Visionary whenever we deny our own truth, our authenticity. The three major mechanisms of self-denial are the false-self system, self-abandonment, and projection.

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Many indigenous cultures sew small pieces of reflective glass or mirrors into ceremonial costumes or glue them onto masks to remind us that we are mirrors for each other. The motif of the mirror, as a metaphor of reflection, is found cross-culturally. Amanda’s note: useful for explaining shadow

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For some indigenous peoples, those who are mirrors for us become our teachers, and demonstrate ways that we may reclaim authenticity by speaking with spirit tongue. These societies believe each person can be either a clear mirror, a smoking mirror, or a split mirror. Clear mirrors are individuals who we idealize or believe that we cannot be like; smoking mirrors are individuals with whom we have difficulty and hope that we are not like them in any way; and split mirrors are people who we like and admire, yet we experience fear or constriction in their presence.

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The psychological term for these diverse kinds of mirrors is projection. We know a projection is at work when there is an energetic charge. Projections are unclaimed self-perceptions. Projections are parts of ourselves that are on their way home, yet are still disowned. We find it more comfortable to have these aspects outside of ourselves, rather than to embrace them as a part of who we are. When we express the Visionary archetype, we update our self-perceptions to accurately reflect the person we have become.

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The concept of the shadow actually means any part of ourselves, positive or challenging, that is not integrated or accepted within our nature. Those shadow parts of us will dominate or persist until they are integrated.

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1. Spend at least fifteen minutes each day in walking meditation. Record your experience in your journal or create a special meditation log.

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5. Set aside some time each season to review your goals and how they support and further your life dream or vision. 6. At least twice a year, spend some extended time alone in nature to revision, redream, and reflect. 7. Consciously extend prayer or nonverbal support to others. Use creative visualizations, affirmations, and visual reminders to support your own growth and development.

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SUMMARY OF THE VISIONARY ARCHETYPE The Visionary archetype asks us to tell the truth without blame or judgment. We express the Visionary when we honor the four ways of seeing and the power of prayer; when we give voice to what we see internally and externally; and when we bring forward our creative spirit and life dream.

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Think about your responses to the following questions. To develop the inner Visionary, ask and answer questions 1 and 2 daily. What is my current capacity for truth-telling without blame or judgment? Practice truth-telling, and notice each day those instances where you were able to express the truth without blame. In what situations and with what people do I find myself feeding the false-self? What are five of my favorite songs? What songs from childhood stay with me? What songs do I teach others? What original songs have I created? Practice singing every day as a way of bringing your voice into the world. Between the ages of four and twelve, what activities captivated me for hours, without the need of anyone else around? Where in my life have I brought forward the creative aspects of who I am? What is my original medicine (my gifts and talents) that is nowhere else duplicated? What makes me laugh? How developed is my sense of humor? What is fun for me? What are the forms of play in my life? What spiritual paths, ideas, and practices have I engaged in? If I were to write a spiritual autobiography, what would it contain? What was my first mystical or numinous experience? What forms of prayer, meditation, or contemplation do I use for guidance? Where do I look for guidance? What practices connect me to my inner life? In what situations or with which people do I abandon myself? Where am I able to maintain my integrity and authenticity, and where am I not able to do so? What projections am I aware of? Who are the clear mirrors, smoking mirrors, and split mirrors in my life?

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each of us carries in our chest a song so old we don’t know if we learned it some night between the murmurs of fallen kisses our lips surprise us when we utter this song that is singing and crying at once —Francisco X Alarcon, Body in Flames

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Wisdom is at work when we are open to all options.

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Shamanic traditions access the human resource of wisdom by learning how to trust and to be comfortable with states of not knowing. In some parts of Africa, an individual who is in a place of not knowing is said to be “walking the land of gray clouds.” During times of not knowing, it is considered foolish to take action and an act of wisdom to wait and trust. Trust, however, can be a difficult skill to learn. The trickster archetype found in many shamanic traditions functions as a Teacher who shocks people into seeing their attachments and habitual patterns. Tricksters typically present surprises and the unexpected as a way of waking people out of their routines.

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The primary purpose of the trickster archetype is to teach human beings about detachment. Most Westerners equate the word “detachment” with “not caring.” Linguistically, however, the word detachment is most often defined as “the capacity to care deeply from an objective place.’ So, when we use the term “detachment” here, we are speaking of what you may think of as nonattachment, letting go, maintaining our sense of humor. If we observe what causes us to lose our sense of humor, we can identify our point of attachment. Where we maintain our sense of humor is where we are detached and can remain flexible. When we are detached, we are able to calmly observe our reactions to situations and not get pulled into an emotional position. Don’t confuse this with coldness and not caring—it’s quite the opposite. When we don’t get pulled in, and when we maintain our sense of humor, we demonstrate our own capacity to care deeply from an objective place.

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The majority of spiritual traditions address the theme of detachment. Harrison Owen, in his book Leadership Is, has consolidated these themes into four principles, which he calls the immutable laws of the spirit: “Whoever is present are the right people to be there; whenever we start, it’s always the right time; what happens is the only thing that could have happened; when it’s over, it’s over.” Underlying each of these premises, whether we agree with them or not, is the principle of acceptance rather than resignation. Can we accept the experience as it is and then be creative with it, rather than be resigned or fatalistic about it? Acceptance is an important part of detachment.

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We experience the shadow side of the Teacher archetype when we find ourselves in states of righteous positionality, judgment, and control. The Teacher embraces these states, but does not indulge in them. The opposite of positionality is flexibility; the other side of judgment is objectivity and discernment; and the opposite of control is trust. Patterns of positionality, judgment, and control are generally fear-based and always reveal lack of trust. If, upon observation, we find that we over-express these patterns, we need to remember that we also carry an enormous gift of wisdom that is waiting to be fully engaged. People who have acute critical natures can utilize them in a constructive way. For example, people skilled at writing may write critical reviews, remembering to evaluate both what is workable and not workable in a project.

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Spend a portion of each day in solitude or in the sweet territory of silence for purposes of listening to your own knowing or wisdom. Set aside one full day a month to spend totally in silence. Create some personal rituals to support you during transitions or times of loss. Consciously make each day a focus for practicing wisdom. Ask yourself How objective can I remain? Am I able to wait instead of act in times of confusion? Can I use discernment rather than judgment? Will I make decisions where I have clarity? Daily practices that prepare us for the art of dying and handling the unfamiliar are situations where we say goodbye or when we go to sleep. In both of these daily practices, learn to trust and let go. Spend some time honoring the richness of your roots and heritage. Collect pictures of important ancestors. Use these as visual reminders of the “good, true, and beautiful” aspects of your heritage. On your birth date, each month, do something that you have never done before. Incorporating this monthly practice into your life increases your capacity to consciously approach the unknown and unfamiliar at least twelve times during the year. During this year, what are the limiting patterns you choose to release from your nature so that you can more fully express who you are?

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The Teacher archetype asks us to be open to outcome, but not attached to outcome. When we express the Teacher, we develop our capacities for detachment; we honor our heritage; we become flexible and fluid, like Grandmother Ocean; and we demonstrate wisdom and its components of clarity, objectivity, and discernment.

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Think about your responses to the following questions. To develop the inner Teacher, ask and answer questions 4 and 7 daily. Who have been the significant teachers in my life? Of these teachers, who were sources of inspiration and who were sources of challenge? What are the consistent qualities that I have been drawn to in these people, if any? What does this reveal about my own inner Teacher? Who have you been a teacher for, and who do you currently hold as a mentor? Who are the trickster figures in my life who have taught me about flexibility and have revealed my patterns of positionality, judgment, and control? What “wake-up” calls have I experienced? How did I become aware of or “awaken” to limiting patterns that I have? What attachments do I find in my personal life? In my professional life? In my spiritual life? What is my tolerance level for silence and my capacity for being alone? Spend some time every day in silence. Enjoy some part of the day as your special alone time. Who are the male ancestors that have both inspired or challenged me? Who are the female ancestor spirits that have both inspired and challenged me? What is my capacity for waiting in times of confusion? What areas of my life carry confusion for me at this time? What current fears am I addressing? What am I consciously ignoring? Of Harrison Owen’s “four immutable laws of the spirit,” which is the most difficult for me to accept or practice? What life-negating family patterns am I consciously willing to break and no longer carry forward? In my family background and heritage, what are the qualities that have been carried forward that I can identify as being “good, true, and beautiful?” How have I handled loss in my life? Of the six categories of loss, which ones am I currently facing?

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Walking the Four-Fold Way means opening to the universal archetypes of the Warrior, the Healer, the Visionary, and the Teacher, which lie within us waiting to express their wisdom in all of our actions and choices in the world. Most shamanic traditions believe that the Warrior’s way is to know the right use of power, the Healer’s way is to extend love, the Visionary’s way is to express creativity and vision, and the Teacher’s way is to model wisdom. Through the resource of power we are able to show up. Through the resource of love we are able to pay attention to what has heart and meaning. Through the resource of vision we are able to give voice to what we see, and through the resource of wisdom we are able to be open to all possibilities and unattached to outcome. 

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We direct to your mind that peace is not merely the absence of war, but the constant effort to maintain harmonious existence between peoples, from individual to individual and between humans and the other beings of this planet. We point out to you that a Spiritual Consciousness is the Path to Survival of Humankind. We who walk about on Mother Earth occupy this place for only a short time. It is our duty as human beings to preserve the life that is here for the benefit of the generations yet unborn.

 

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